Here you can find the resources we are developing for the journey. These will added to throughout the Magnus 900 year and beyond and automatically added to the smartphone app.

Downloadable GPX file for use with mapping applications, including Ordnance Survey

Imaginative reflection on the reception of Magnus' body

Imaginative reflection on the reception of Magnus' body

Reflection on the understanding of creation in the twelfth century

Logo of the St Magnus Way, copyright Orkney Pilgrimage

Looking west across Aikerness to Costa Hill.

Map of the route of the second section of the St Magnus Way, from Birsay to Dounby.

Audio recording of historical information about Kingshouse, Harray, where an unknown mound (visible to the southeast of North Bigging) is traditionally associated with a resting place of St Magnus.

Audio recording of historical information about the Knowes of Conyar, also known as St Magnus's Resting Place.

There is a rich Magnus tradition associated with an 8ft high standing stone on the top of Stoney Hill in Harray. This prehistoric stone, is the only remaining stone from a stone circle that once dominated the skyline.

There are two places in the south corner of Harray which have been suggested as resting places of Magnus: A mound called Howinawheel on the land of Winksetter and a stone at or near The Refuge. There is about a mile distance between these two places and the traditions for both rely on place-name evidence.

A small artificial island in the Loch of Wasdale (in the parish of Firth), once reached by means of submerged stepping stones, is the site of a chapel. This chapel, for which no dedication survives, has no associated burial ground, which is unusual.

The first Magnus resting place in Firth was thought to be a mound ‘somewhat to the west of Finstown with a standing stone on top’.

The name Whilcoe, now Quilco and the name of a housing estate, referred at the end of the nineteenth century to a boundary stone marking the three parishes of Birsay, Harray and Sandwick.

View of Dounby crossroads from the picnic tables opposite the Smithfield Hotel.

There are various traditions associated with the transportation of that Magnus’s shrine through the parish of Harray on the way from Birsay to Kirkwall.

Reflection on the heart as we journey to the heart of the Mainland.

Photo of Damsay with the Holm of Grimbister in front.

Description of the route from Evie to Birsay.

Photograph of Firth Bay, with the Holm of Grimbister and Damsay beyond it.

A draft response to Orkney Island Council's core path consultation which closes on the 28th August.

Historical information on how the bones of Magnus came to be in the Cathedral, were thought lost after the Reformation and then rediscovered in the 1920s.

Historical information about St Olaf's Kirk, where Magnus's bones were brought to from Birsay before the Cathedral was ready.

Poem on how the St Magnus Way does not need to be declared open, written for the launch of the final section.

This project is being part financed by the Scottish Government and the European Community Orkney LEADER 2014 – 2020 Programme

Keep In Touch

Subscribe to our mailing list to keep up-to-date with the latest news about the St Magnus Way.